7-9-2010; 11.16u – Kop en intro aangepast op basis van alle reacties.

Met het 1-op-1 overnemen van de term “plagiaat” uit de kop van het blogbericht van Donna Laframboise van 3 september The book the IPCC plagiarised is een heftige discussie losgetrapt op deze website. Dank voor ieders bijdragen. Uiteindelijk zie ik me genoopt de titel aan te passen. Het laat onverlet dat Laframboise overtuigend laat zien dat het beeld dat het IPCC ooit zuiver wetenschappelijk begon en pas de laatste jaren politiek gecorrumpeerd raakte, moet worden bijgesteld.

Laframboise ontdekte dat de Australische IPCC-auteur Tony McMichael heeft in de klimaatbijbel 2.0 die in 1995 verscheen vele passages uit zijn eigen apocalyptische activistische boek Planetary Overload uit 1993 parafraseerde. Dit boek putte weer vrijelijk uit de eeuwige Greenpeace folders. Niet netjes is dat het boek niet wordt genoemd tussen de 182 referenties van het hoofdstuk over klimaat & gezondheid.

Voor het hele verhaal zie The book the IPCC plagiarised. Voor het gemak wel hieronder de complete reeks gevonden geparafraseerde passages. Vermakelijke lectuur:

McMichael’s 1993 book, page 150:

Sandstorms in Kansas (USA) and in the Sudan have been accompanied by increased illness and death from bronchitis and asthma.

Climate Bible’s 1995 Working Group 2 report, page 578:

Sandstorms in Kansas (USA) and the Sudan have been accompanied by increases in bronchitis and asthma.

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McMichael’s 1993 book, page 155:

In Egypt, for example, the water snails tend to lose their schistosome infections during the winter months (January-March). However, if temperatures increase, snails may spread schistosomiasis throughout the year, thus increasing the already heavy parasite burden in rural Egypt.

Climate Bible’s 1995 Working Group 2 report, page 574:

In Egypt, for example, water snails tend to lose their schistosome infections during winter, but if temperatures increase, snails may mediate schistosomiasis transmission throughout the year.

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McMichael’s 1993 book, page 155:

Arboviral infections span a wide clinical spectrum, from those that cause mild feverish illness or subclinical infections to those causing severe and often fatal encephalitis (brain inflammation) or hemorrhagic fever. Under favourable environmental conditions, an arboviral disease can become epidemic (population-wide), from a local endemic base – in much the same way that cholera has recently broken out…

Climate Bible’s 1995 Working Group 2 report, page 575:

Arboviral infections span a wide clinical spectrum, from those that cause mild feverish illness or subclinical inflections to those causing severe and often fatal encephalitis (brain inflammation) or hemorrhagic fever. Under favorable environmental conditions, an arboviral disease can become epidemic (population-wide), from a local endemic base or by its introduction to a previously unaffected area.

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McMichael’s 1993 book, page 154:

In eastern Africa, a relatively small increase in winter temperature would enable the malarial zone to extend ‘upwards’ to engulf the large urban highland populations that are currently off-limits to the mosquito because of the cooler temperatures at higher altitudes – e.g. Nairobi (Kenya) and Harare (Zimbabwe). Indeed, such populations around the world, currently just outside the margins of endemic malaria, would provide early evidence of climate-related shifts in the distribution of this disease.

Climate Bible’s 1995 Working Group 2 report, page 574:

Hence, it is a reasonable prediction that, in eastern Africa, a relatively small increase in winter temperature could extend the mosquito habitat and thus enable faciparum malaria to reach beyond the usual altitude limit of around 2,500 m to the large, malaria-free, urban highland populations, e.g. Nairobi in Kenya and Harare in Zimbabwe. Indeed, the monitoring of such populations around the world, currently just beyond the boundaries of stable endemic malaria, could provide early evidence of climate-related shifts in malaria distribution.

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McMichael’s 1993 book, page 165:

Already in Africa, there are over 100 million people who are ‘food insecure’, many of them in the arid Sahel region, home to approximately 35 million people.

Climate Bible’s 1995 Working Group 2 report, page 577:

Already in Africa, more than 100 million people are “food insecure,” many of them in the arid Sahel region.

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McMichael’s 1993 book, page 166:

A rise in temperature could also have significant effects on the growth and health of farm animals. Young animals are less tolerant of a wide range of temperature than are adult animals.

Climate Bible’s 1995 Working Group 2 report, page 577

An increase in temperature and temperature extremes could also affect the growth and health of farm animals; young animals are much less tolerant of temperature variation than are adult animals.

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McMichael’s 1993 book, page 166:

With respect to adverse effects on livestock, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has identified several infectious diseases – such as the horn fly in beef and dairy cattle and insect-borne anaplasmosis infection in sheep and cattle – which might well increase in response to climate changes.

Climate Bible’s 1995 Working Group 2 report, page 577:

For example, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has identified several infectious diseases – such as the horn fly in beef and dairy cattle and insect-borne anaplasmosis infection in sheep and cattle – that could increase in prevalence in response to climate changes.

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McMichael’s 1993 book, page 187:

UNEP predicts that an average 10% loss of ozone (such has become established at middle-to-high latitudes in recent years), if sustained globally over three-four decades, would cause at least 300,000 additional cases of non-melanocytic skin cancer worldwide each year and 4,500 extra cases of malignant melanoma – and possibly double that figure.

Climate Bible’s 1995 Working Group 2 report, page 578:

The UN environment Programme predicts that an average 10% loss of ozone (such as occurred at middle-to-high latitudes over the past decade), if sustained globally over several decades, would cause approximately 250,000 additional cases of [nonmelanocytic skin cancers] worldwide each year.

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